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Macedon may be home to Alicia Keys and Swizz Beatz' new arts center

A project with a lot of star power behind it may soon be coming to the town of Macecon. Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Alicia Keys and her husband, hip-hop recording arist and music producer Kasseem Dean, known professionally as Swizz Beatz, are in the process of buying a 100-plus-acre former industrial site on Route 31. That's where they want to locate a music and art campus for up-and-coming musicians and artists. Plans call for a performing arts center, classroom space, cafeteria, an...

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Dave Burbank

Different Radio will once again be live at the Grassroots Festival this Friday morning beginning at 9:00 during Open Tunings with Scott Regan.

NASA

Tune in tonight for a special trip on the Road To Joy. I'm taking a journey to the Moon in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first spacewalk on the moon! Do you remember it? If you do, tell me what you remember about it in the comments below.

That's from 6:00-8:00 tonight! wrur.org anywhere on planet Earth, 88.5FM in Rochester, 90.1 WITH in Ithaca! Don't miss it!

With a blast of Trombone Shorty's horn, the Rochester International Jazz Festival roared to a satisfying close Saturday night.

Responding to a final day of gorgeous weather over its nine days, the fest drew an estimated 208,000 people, pretty much matching last year's total. 

This was only the second time in its 18-year history that the fest escaped rain. The only other time that happened was in 2007. So the gods were with us. "I made a few phone calls," festival co-producer John Nugent said.

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Josh Rouse On Mountain Stage

19 hours ago

Flanked by long-time bandmates Marc Pisapia on drums/vocals and James Haggerty on bass/vocals, the now Nashville-based Josh Rouse strolls back for his third visit to Mountain Stage (but his first in 15 years) by making himself right at home during a four-song set recorded Sept. 16, 2018 at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va.

Here's a statistic for you: According to Fender Guitars, women now make up 50% of all entry-level players who buy their products.

Why am I sharing that?

"There is never any end," John Coltrane said sometime in the mid-1960s, at the height of his powers. "There are always new sounds to imagine; new feelings to get at." Coltrane, one of jazz's most revered saxophonists, was speaking to Nat Hentoff about an eternal quest — a compulsion to reach toward the next horizon, and the next.

Sleater-Kinney got a new beginning a few years ago. In 2006, the trio — guitarists Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein and drummer Janet Weiss — announced a hiatus, after half a dozen albums that had made it one of the most respected and beloved rock bands around.

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World Cafe on WRUR

The premier public radio showcase for contemporary music serving up an eclectic blend that includes blues, rock, world, folk, and alternative country.

2019 Jazz Festival Coverage

Check out our coverage from the 2019 CGI Rochester International Jazz Festival! Preview, reviews, photos, videos, and more!

A project with a lot of star power behind it may soon be coming to the town of Macecon.

Grammy-winning singer and songwriter Alicia Keys and her husband, hip-hop recording arist and music producer Kasseem Dean, known professionally as Swizz Beatz, are in the process of buying a 100-plus-acre former industrial site on Route 31.

That's where they want to locate a music and art campus for up-and-coming musicians and artists.

Dave Burbank

Different Radio will once again be live at the Grassroots Festival this Friday morning beginning at 9:00 during Open Tunings with Scott Regan.

NASA

Tune in tonight for a special trip on the Road To Joy. I'm taking a journey to the Moon in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first spacewalk on the moon! Do you remember it? If you do, tell me what you remember about it in the comments below.

That's from 6:00-8:00 tonight! wrur.org anywhere on planet Earth, 88.5FM in Rochester, 90.1 WITH in Ithaca! Don't miss it!

With a blast of Trombone Shorty's horn, the Rochester International Jazz Festival roared to a satisfying close Saturday night.

Responding to a final day of gorgeous weather over its nine days, the fest drew an estimated 208,000 people, pretty much matching last year's total. 

This was only the second time in its 18-year history that the fest escaped rain. The only other time that happened was in 2007. So the gods were with us. "I made a few phone calls," festival co-producer John Nugent said.

The alchemy began with the opening salvos of Acoustic Alchemy and its powerful performance. The band made wide-sweeping strokes across the canvas. Just when you thought they were going to break free stylistically, they'd pitch an elegant U-turn back to their roots and the thrill at hand. 

Minding history

The centuries haven't been kind to humanity. There really isn't a lot we need to relive about the past. Except the music. 

Backed by an acoustic trio of guitar, bass and piano, Rochester International Jazz Festival favorite Catherine Russell overlooked no detail in mining the 1920s, 30s and 40s Friday night at two packed shows at Temple Building Theater. 

Attention dear readers: This is Jeff Spevak. Frank offered to mow my lawn for a month if I'd write his blog entry tonight. Besides, how hard can it be? He learned everything from reading me and Raymond Chandler.

Downright sinister

Playing in a band, it's tough work, as Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters made clear in their performance at Geva Theatre Center's Fielding Stage.

Veronica Swift was swift, if you get my drift. She positively slayed the joint with lightning speed and lightning lingual dexterity. In other words: she's fast. If I could sing or talk that fast, I'd certainly win more arguments at home (please, don't tell my wife). 

John Nugent, the CGI Rochester International Jazz Festival's artistic director, typically introduces the Kilbourn Hall concerts, but this time he came out with a saxophone. Nugent choked up as he described hearing George Coleman's solo on "Stella by Starlight" on a Miles Davis album while he was a student at West Texas State University. "And it changed my life," Nugent said.

George Coleman and his quartet got off to a rousing start Thursday evening, with Nugent harmonizing with Coleman on Gene Ammons and Sonny Stitt's classic, "Blues Up and Down." 

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