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Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

Confronted with a torrent of lawsuits across the U.S., several major drug companies are in discussions with authorities to resolve thousands of opioid-related suits filed against them. A government source close to the negotiations tells NPR that Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson, Endo International and Allergan are looking to cut deals.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Epstein is dead, but that doesn't mean his accusers have been silenced.

Updated at 7:17 p.m. ET

Seven major publishing houses say that Audible, the audiobook company owned by Amazon, is violating copyright law with a planned speech-to-text feature that's set to launch next month. In a lawsuit filed Friday in federal court, the publishers allege that the feature, Audible Captions, repurposes copyrighted work for its own benefit by transcribing audiobooks' narration for subscribers to read along as they listen.

The company behind the controversial Keystone XL pipeline has won a major victory in Nebraska, where environmental activists, two Native American tribes and some local landowners had sought to derail its construction. The state's Supreme Court on Friday ruled unanimously in favor of an alternate route proposed by TC Energy, formerly known as TransCanada.

After weeks of public silence, the tycoon believed to be Hong Kong's richest man pulled out the stops when finally he finally weighed in on the unrest seething in his backyard. Li Ka-shing, a mega-investor worth more than $27 billion at last check, took out full-page ads in two of his local newspapers, the Hong Kong Economic Times and Hong Kong Economic Journal.

Fires in Brazil's Amazon rainforest are proliferating at an alarming rate.

That's the gist of an announcement this week by the country's National Institute for Space Research, or INPE. According to the agency, there have been 74,155 fires in Brazil so far this year — most of which erupted in the Amazon. That represents an astonishing leap of more than 80% over last year and by far the most that the agency has recorded since it began compiling this data in 2013.

For months, Hong Kong's streets have seethed with discontent. Scenes from the semiautonomous region show protesters, sometimes numbering in the hundreds of thousands, many wearing surgical masks and carrying umbrellas that have come to signify resistance.

The images are astonishing, and the issues that set the protests in motion are complex.

So here's a primer breaking down the major players, why they have poured into the streets and the response so far from China.

It has been a tumultuous quarter century for San Francisco, what with the rise of its neighbor, Silicon Valley, and the changes that came with it. But at least a couple of things have stayed reliably consistent, such as the distinctive Bay Area fog that's so familiar it even has a name (just call it Karl) and the live webcam that watches it from the campus of San Francisco State University.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide in his Manhattan prison cell, according to the office of New York City's chief medical examiner. The office announced its findings in a statement released Friday afternoon, six days after the wealthy financier was found unresponsive while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

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