WRUR 88.5 Different Radio

Isabella Gomez Sarmiento

Isabella Gomez Sarmiento is a production assistant with Weekend Edition.

She was a 2019 Kroc Fellow. During her fellowship, she reported for Goats and Soda, the National Desk and Weekend Edition. She also wrote for NPR Music and contributed to the Alt.Latino podcast.

Gomez Sarmiento joined NPR after graduating from Georgia State University with a B.A. in journalism, where her studies focused on the intersections of media and gender. Throughout her time at school, she wrote for outlets including Teen Vogue, CNN, Remezcla, She Shreds Magazine and more.

Around the world, people have held vigils, organized protests and painted murals this week to show solidarity with the Black Lives Matter protests taking place across America.

These events are also taking place in countries struggling with their own crises — conflict, poverty, the pandemic. America's loud call for justice after the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and many more black Americans has resonated.

This is part of a series looking at pressing coronavirus questions of the week. We'd like to hear what you're curious about. Email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions."

What risks are there in attending a protest rally?

Modelers say it's difficult to assess how the protests will influence COVID-19 infections. But it's clear that a key ingredient for transmission is present at many of these rallies: close contact.

I need to take a trip that would be either a few hours flying or multiple days driving. Which is safer?

As lockdown orders are relaxed to some capacity in countries around the world, travel is starting to see an uptick for the first time since mid-March. But when it comes to taking a longer trip, is it better to travel by car or by plane?

What advice is there for the army of new contact tracers out to find anyone who has been near a newly diagnosed coronavirus patient?

For nearly three years, Mark Green led the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in delivering foreign aid to countries in need during times of crisis, including the coronavirus pandemic.

When Cardi B went live on Instagram last month to tell her fans they should be taking COVID-19 seriously, a Brooklyn DJ laid her speech over a beat and turned it into an iTunes success.

Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, young people have been heavily criticized for not taking social distancing seriously.

On a typical sunny spring afternoon, the outdoor seating of Atlanta's Krog Street Market would usually be packed. But it's not a typical week.

As more and more people practice social distancing and stay inside in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, the tables at Krog are completely deserted.

Most restaurant booths have large signs indicating they're either closed or only serving food to-go. But there's still people coming in and out, carrying Postmates and GrubHub bags.

It's Friday afternoon, and 12 people are gathered in a pole dancing class in Washington, D.C. They start warming up in front of a wall of mirrors, music at full blast. At first, it looks like any fitness class with the first 15 or so minutes consisting mainly of ground stretching on yoga mats.

Then they climb up on the poles. Some people twirl around, others fully invert, lifting their legs over their heads.

What can't Bad Bunny do?

Challenging traditional gender norms and aesthetics in the male-dominated world of urbano? Check. Revealing, via the heartfelt closing track of his new album, that he might be retiring at the end of this year? Check.

Pages