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Bruce Warren

Bruce Warren is assistant general manager for programming of WXPN in Philadelphia. Besides serving as executive producer of World Café, Warren also contributes to Paste magazine and writes for two blogs: Some Velvet Blog and WXPN's All About The Music Blog.

The last time we heard from Citizen Cope, a.k.a. Clarence Greenwood, was on his 2012 album, One Lovely Day. After six years, the wait is over and Cope is returning with his first new album of studio recordings, Heroin and Helicopters, out on March 1, 2019.

What constitutes bluegrass music? Does it need to be all acoustic? Can it ever be electric? Does it always include a banjo, a mandolin, a dobro and fiddles? If it ventures into jam band territory, is it still bluegrass?

The bluegrass question is one that the immensely talented Kalamazoo, Mich. band Greensky Bluegrass has been grappling with and answering since the members started 18 years ago.

One of the most anticipated showcases at the Americana Music Association's AmericanaFest in Nashville in September was from Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter Sam Morrow. Like many of the artists at the festival, Morrow played multiple shows — six in four days with his band of roots-rockers.

Here at the World Cafe, we've had hours of conversations about what some of the greatest years in music are. So far, we've presented the case for 1967, for 1978 and 1988.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify and Apple playlists at the bottom of the page.

Over the course of his career, Trent Dabbs has written a lot of songs. While you might not know his name, or his own solo material, there's a very good chance you've heard and know some of the songs Dabbs has written or co-written with others. The Nashville-based songwriter's credits include "High Horse," by Kacey Musgraves, "Girls Chase Boys" by Ingrid Michaelson, and "Deep Water" by American Authors.

Last month at the Americana Music Association's AmericanaFest in Nashville, public radio station WMOT, NPR Music and World Cafe presented five days of live performances at a tiny venue called The Local.

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